Dominion Voting Systems: The Canadian Company At The Center Of U.S. Election Fraud Claims

- TECHNOCRACY NEWS - Nov 9, 2020 -

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In computer software development lingo, a “glitch” is slang for an unintentional software malfunction. Voting software that switches votes means that it was intentionally programmed to do so.


This is an extension of Big Tech’s dictatorial stranglehold on censorship of opposing ideas. ⁃ TN Editor


The Dominion Voting Systems, which has been used in multiple states where fraud has been alleged in the 2020 U.S. Election, was rejected three times by data communications experts from the Texas Secretary of State and Attorney General’s Office for failing to meet basic security standards.


Unlike Texas, other states certified the use of the system, including Pennsylvania, where voter fraud has been alleged on multiple counts this week.


Dominion Voting Systems, a Canadian company headquartered in Denver, is one of three companies primarily used in U.S. elections. The others are Election Systems and Software and Texas based-Hart InterCivic.


The Dominion system was implemented in North Carolina and Nevada, where election results are being challenged, and in Georgia and Michigan, where a “glitch” that occurred reversed thousands of votes for Republican President Donald Trump to Democrat Joe Biden.


While Biden declared victory Saturday in his U.S. presidential race against Trump, the Trump campaign is launching several challenges to vote counts in states across the country, alleging fraud.


Dominion’s Democracy Suite system was chosen for statewide implementation in New Mexico in 2013, the first year it was rejected by the state of Texas.


Louisiana modernized its mail ballot system by implementing Dominion’s ImageCast Central software statewide; Clark County, Nevada, implemented the same system in 2017. Roughly 52 counties in New York, 65 counties in Michigan and the entire state of Colorado and New Mexico use Dominion systems.


According to a Penn Wharton study, “The Business of Voting,” Dominion Voting Systems reached approximately 71 million voters in 1,635 jurisdictions in the U.S. in 2016.


Dominion “got into trouble” with several subsidiaries it used over alleged cases of fraud. One subsidiary is Smartmatic, a company “that has played a significant role in the U.S. market over the last decade,” according to a report published by UK-based AccessWire.


LEIA MAIS:

https://www.technocracy.news/dominion-voting-systems-the-canadian-company-at-the-center-of-u-s-election-fraud-claims/

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